Futurology, Science Fiction, Utopia, and Alienation
in the Work of Imre Madách, György Lukács, and Other Hungarian Writers:
Select Bibliography

Compiled by Ralph Dumain


Balogh, Csaba. The Tragedy of Man and the antinomy of contemporary criticism: Summary of Doctoral Dissertation. Budapest, 2009.

Bangha, Imre. “The Tree that Set Forth: Rabindranath Tagore’s Reception in Hungary,” Archív Orientalní [Prague], 68/3, August 2000, pp. 457-476.

See esp. the reactions of Babits, Kosztolányi, Karinthy (parodic), Lukács (negative), Márai, Szerb (unflattering).

Bényei, Tamás. “Leakings: Reappropriating Science Fiction: The Case of Kurt Vonnegut," in Anatomy of Science Fiction, edited & introduced by Donald E. Morse (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars, 2006), pp. 48-69.

Bisztray, George. “Man's Biological Future in Hungarian Utopian Literature,” Canadian-American Review of Hungarian Studies, Vol. 3, No 1, Spring 1976, pp. 3-13.

Author suggests that there is a Hungarian utopian tradition that has not received adequate attention. Note treatment of Imre Madách (Lukács’ perspective also mentioned), Mor Jókai, and Karinthy, particularly Karinthy’s Tomorrow Morning and A Journey Around My Skull. Note contrast of Karinthy with Hesse. Other Hungarians mentioned are György Bessenyei, Mihály Babits, Sándor Szathmári, Tibor Déry, Peter Lengyel.

Bozsik, Mary Adrienne Kaiser. Dystopian Futuristic Visions in Imre Madách’s The Tragedy of Man. MA thesis, Dept. of Comparative Literature, University of Alberta, 1985.

Church, Alonzo. Review: Béla Fogarasi, Logik; The Journal of Symbolic Logic, vol. 21, no. 3, September 1956, p. 314.

Cornis-Pope, Marcel; Neubauer, John; eds. History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe: Junctures and Disjunctures in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Amsterdam; Philadelphia: J. Benjamins, 2004. (Comparative History of Literatures in European languages; 19) Note Szathmári.

Csala, Katalin. “The Puzzling Connection between H. G. Wells and Frigyes Karinthy,” in The Reception of H. G. Wells in Europe, edited by Patrick Parrinder & John S. Partington (London: Thoemmes Continuum, 2005), pp. 195-204.

Czigány, Lóránt. “Jókai’s Popularity in Victorian England,” The New Hungarian Quarterly, no. 60 (vol. 16, 1975), pp. 186-192.

Czigányik, Zsolt. "Contemporary Utopian Studies in Hungary," Utopian Studies, vol. 27, no. 3, 2016, pp. 449-456.

Czigányik, Zsolt. “From the Bright Future of the Nation to the Dark Future of Mankind: Jókai and Karinthy in Hungarian Utopian Tradition,” Hungarian Cultural Studies, vol. 8, 2015, pp. 12-23.

Discusses György Bessenyei, Karinthy, and briefly, Szathmári. The bulk of the essay is devoted to Jókai’s A jövõ század regénye (The Novel of the Century to Come).

Czigányik, Zsolt. “The Hungarian Translations of Thomas More’s Utopia,” Utopian Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, 2016, pp. 323-332.

Mentions Madách, Jókai, Karinthy, and Szathmári. Also mentioned are Comenius (Jan Amos Komensky), Bessenyei, Babits, and Déry.

Demeter, Tamás. “The Sociological Tradition of Hungarian Philosophy,” Studies in East European Thought, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, The Sociological Tradition of Hungarian Philosophy, June 2008, pp. 1-16.

Note Lukács on Madách.

Farkas, Ákos. Review (Tamás Morus, Utópia, translated by Tibor Kardos), Utopian Studies, vol. 3, no. 1 (1992), pp. 169-171.

Fehér, Bence. Greek antiquity in tragical and comical contexts: the idea of Greek democracy in Madách's works.

Fekete, John. “Science Fiction in Hungary,” Science Fiction Studies, vol. 16, no. 2 (48), July 1989, pp. 191-200.

Fenyo, Mario D. Literature and Political Change: Budapest, 1908-1918. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1987. (Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, vol. 77, part 6, 1987) On Nyugat.

Forgács, “The Safe Haven of a New Classicism: The Quest for a New Aesthetics in Hungary 1904-1912,” Studies in East European Thought, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, June 2008, The Sociological Tradition of Hungarian Philosophy, pp. 75-95.

Fox, Patricia D. “What’s Past is Prologue: Imagining the Socialist Nation in Cuba and in Hungary,” CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture, volume 1, issue 1, March 1999, article 3. Note re Imre Madách, Géza Ottlik.

Gabel, Joseph. Mannheim and Hungarian Marxism, translated by William M. Stein and James McCrate. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 1991. See also extracts Alienation, Utopia, & Hungarian intellectuals: Madách, Ady, Karinthy, Fogarasi, Nádor, Lukács, Mannheim.

Gángó, Gábor. “Anti-Metaphysical Reasoning and Sociological Approach: Roads from Nationalism to Regionalism in the 19th-20th Century Hungarian Intellectual Tradition,” Studies in East European Thought, vol. 60, no. 1/2, June 2008, pp. 17-30.

Gluck, Mary. The Invisible Jewish Budapest: Metropolitan Culture at the Fin de Sičcle. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2016.

Gottlieb, Erika. “The Cultural Transfer of Science Fiction and Fantasy in Hungary 1989-1995” [review], Utopian Studies, Winter 2001.

Gottlieb, Erika. Dystopian Fiction East and West: Universe of Terror and Trial. Montreal; Ithaca, NY: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2001. (See Dystopia west, dystopia east: the vanishing of speculative fiction under Stalinism. Note references to Čapek, Madách,  Karinthy, Szathmári.)

Contents:
What is justice? The answers of utopia, tragedy, and dystopia — Nineteenth-century precursors of the dystopian vision — The dictator behind the mask: Zamiatin’s We, Huxley’s Brave New World, and Orwell’s Ninteenth Eighty-Four — Dictatorship without a mask: Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, Vonnegut’s Player Piano, and Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale — The writer on trial: socialist realism and the exile of speculative fiction — The dystopia of revolutionary justice: Serge’s Conquered City, Zazubrin’s “The Chip,” and Rodionov’s Chocolate — The legalization of terror: Platonov’s The Foundation Pit, Ribakov’s Children of the Arbat, and Koestler’s Darkness at Noon — Terror in war, terror in peace: Grossman’s Life and Fate, Tertz Sinyavski’s The Trial Begins, and Daniel’s This is Moscow Speaking — Collective paranoia: the persecutor and the persecuted: Andzrejewski, Déry, Fuks, Hlasko, Örkény, Vaculik, and Mrozek — Kafka’s ghost: The trial as theatre: Klima’s The Castle, Karvas’s The Big Wig, and Havel’s Memorandum — From terror to entropy: the downward spiral: Konwicki’s A Minor Apocalypse, Déry’s Mr G.A. in X and Zinoviev’s The Radiant Future — Speculative fiction returns from exile: Dystopian vision with a sneer: Voinovich’s Moscow 2042, Aksyonov’s The Island of Crimea, Dalos’s 1985, and Moldova’s Hitler in Hungary — Dystopia East and West: conclusion.

Gottlieb, Erika. “Orwell in the 1980s” [review essay], Utopian Studies, vol. 3, no. 1 (1992), pp. 108-120.

Hanák, Péter. The Garden and the Workshop: Essays on the Cultural History of Vienna and Budapest. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998.

See esp. chapter 3: “The Garden and the Workshop: Reflections on Fin-de-Siècle Culture in Vienna and Budapest" (pp. 63-97); chapter 5: “The Start of Endre Ady’s Literary Career (1903-1905)” (119-134); chapter 7: “Social Marginality and Cultural Creativity in Vienna and Budapest (1890-1914)” (147-177). Note references to Babits, Füst, Jászi, Juhász, Karinthy, Kosztolányi, Lukács, Móricz, A. N. Nagy, Örkény, Tóth in chapter 3. See excerpt Péter Hanák on Nyugat.

Hartvig, Gabriella. The Critical and Creative Reception of Eighteenth-Century British and Anglo-Irish Authors in Hungary. Pécs: University of Pécs, 2013. Includes:

“The Dean in Hungary,” pp. 11-30. Previously published in Hartvig, 2005.

“Hungarian Gullivariads: Gulliver’s Travels in Faremidó, Capillária, and Kazohinia,” pp. 31-45. Previously published in Hartvig, 2008.

“Gulliver’s Umpteenth Voyage in Hungary: the Most Recent Sequels,” pp. 47-63.

Includes discussion of Karinthy and Szathmári. Originally published in Literary and Cultural Relations: Ireland, Hungary, and Central and Eastern Europe, ed. Mária Kurdi (Dublin: Carysfort Press, 2009).

Hartvig, Gabriella. “The Dean in Hungary,” in The Reception of Jonathan Swift in Europe, edited by Hermann J. Real (London; New York: Continuum, 2005), pp. 224-237.

Karinthy and Szathmári are discussed here.

Hartvig, Gabriella. "Hungarian Gulliveriads: Gulliver's Travels in Faremidó, Capillária, and Kazohinia," in Reading Swift: Papers from The Fifth Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift, edited by Hermann J. Real (München: Wilhelm Fink, 2008), pp. 519-31.

Includes a comparison of Karinthy and Szathmári.

A hundred and fifty years of The tragedy of man (web site).

Karinthy, Frigyes. Grave and Gay: Selections from His Work, selected by István Kerékgyárto, afterword by Károly Szalay. Budapest: Corvina Press, 1973.

Karinthy, Frigyes. Voyage to Faremido. Capillaria; introduced and translated by Paul Tabori. Budapest: Corvina Press, 1965; New York: Living Books, 1966.

This edition omits the “Letter to H. G. Wells” (July 1925) that prefaces Capillaria.

Keleman, János. “Art’s Struggle for Freedom: Lukács, the Literary Historian,” in Georg Lukács Reconsidered: Critical Essays in Politics, Philosophy and Aesthetics, edited by Michael J. Thompson (London: Continuum, 2011), pp. 110-127.

Kleinheincz, Csilla. “A brief introduction to Hungarian science fiction and fantasy,” The Portal, 6 December 2010.

Kleinheincz, Csilla. Hungarian Post-Communist Science Fiction, The World SF Blog, February 2009.

Kohut, George Alexander. Imre Madách (1823-1864): Critical and Biographical Introduction, in The Library of the World's Best Literature: An Anthology in Thirty Volumes, C.D. Warner, et al., comp., 1917.

Koltai, Tamás. “Heroism and Failure,” The Hungarian Quarterly, vol. XXXIX, no. 150, Summer 1998.

Koltai, Tamás. “Game and Talk Shows, Back to School (Péter Kárpáti, Kálmán Mikszáth, Imre Madách).” The Hungarian Quarterly, vol. 41, no. 157, February 2000, pp. 150-152.

Koltai, Tamás. “A New National: Imre Madách: Az ember tragédiája (The Tragedy of Man); William Shakespeare: A vihar (The Tempest),” The Hungarian Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 166, May 2002), pp. 151-156.

Koltai, Tamás. “Tragedies and Comedies,” The Hungarian Quarterly, vol. XL, no. 156, Winter 1999.

Koltai, Tamás. “The Tragedies of Man,” The Hungarian Quarterly, vol. XXXVIII, no. 147, Autumn 1997.

Kovári, Orsolya. “Mr Dracula - On Béla Lugosi,” translated by Péter Balikó Lengyel, Hungarian Review, vol. IV, no. 3, May 2013.

Lugosi had to leave Hungary after the fall of the 1919 Hungarian Soviet Republic. He toured the USA directing and/or acting as Adam in Madach’s The Tragedy of Man. See also:

Sink Your Teeth into a Hungarian Star’s Legacy (1 November 2010)

Az Ember Tragédiája (The Tragedy of Man) (1922): Lexington Theatre, New York, April 8, 1922; New Yorker Volkszeitung, April 9, 1922

Küchler, Ulrike. “Alien Art: Encounters with Otherworldly Places and Inter-medial Spaces,” in Alien Imaginations: Science Fiction and Tales of Transnationalism, edited by Ulrike Küchler, Silja Maehl, Graeme Stout; foreword by Dame Gillian Beer (New York: Bloomsbury Academy, 2015), pp. 31-55.

Includes discussion of Frigyes Karinthy’s Voyage to Faremido.

Lesér, Esther H. “A Hungarian View of the World, Expressed in a Faustian Tragedy: Some Considerations upon Madach’s The Tragedy of Man,” The Canadian-American Review of Hungarian Studies, vol. V, no. 2, Fall 1978, pp. 43-51.

Lotze, Dieter P. “From the ‘Goethe of Széphalom’ to the ‘Hungarian Faust’: A Half Century of Goethe Reception in Hungary,” Canadian-American Review of Hungarian Studies, Vol. 6, No 1, Spring 1979, pp. 3-19.

Lotze, Dieter P. Imre Madách. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1981. (Twayne World Authors Series; no. 617)

Lotze, Dieter P. “Imre Madach is Alive and Well and Dying in West Germany: Peter Michael Hamel’s Opera ‘Ein Menschentraum’,” Hungarian Studies Review, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Fall 1984) p. 3-14.

Lotze, Dieter P. “Of Cockroaches and ‘Civilizing’ Hungary: Imre Madách as an Aristophanic Satirist,” Neohelicon, vol. 10, no. 1, February 1983, pp. 203-219.

Löwy, Michael. “‘Fascinating Delusive Light’: Georg Lukács and Franz Kafka,” Georg Lukács: The Fundamental Dissonance of Existence: Aesthetics, Politics, Literature, edited by Timothy Bewes and Timothy Hall (London; New York: Continuum, 2011), pp. 178-187.

Lukács, Georg. “The Metaphysics of Tragedy (Paul Ernst)” (1910), in Soul and Form, translated by Anna Bostock (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1974), pp. 152-174. See excerpts.

Lukács, György. Fejlő désének története (1911) [The history of the development of modern drama]. Budapest: Magvető, 1978.

Entwicklungsgeschichte des modernen Dramas; herausgegeben von Frank Benseler. Darmstadt: Luchterhand, 1981. (Georg Lukács Werke; Bd. 15)

Die ungarische Dramenliteratur, Chapter xv, Section 1, pp. 542-544 =

On Hungarian Dramatic Literature, translated by Charles Senger

“The Sociology of Modern Drama”  [1909/1911? - excerpt from Entwicklungsgeschichte des modernen Dramas], translated by Lee Baxandall (1965), in The Theory of the Modern Stage, edited by Eric Bentley (London: Penguin Books, 1968), pp. 425-450.

Madách Tragédiája mint negatív példa: (1) Excerpt from A modern dráma fejlõdésének története (1911); (2) Balázs Béla és akiknek nem kell. Elõszó (1918); Madách tragédiája (1955).

Lukács, György. “Madách tragédiája” (1955) [Madach’s tragedy], with Rónai, Mihály András; Madách-Lukács Vitairat. Budapest: Glória Kiadó, 1998. Alternative citation:  G. Lukács, Magyar irodalom, magyar kultúra, 570.

Lukács, György. “An Entire Epoch of Inhumanity” (Appendix), translated by Zachary Sng, in Georg Lukács: The Fundamental Dissonance of Existence: Aesthetics, Politics, Literature, edited by Timothy Bewes and Timothy Hall (London; New York: Continuum, 2011), pp. 221-226.

Foreword, December 1964, for Volume 6 (The Problems of Realism, 3) of Lukács’ Collected Works. See also Löwy, “‘Fascinating Delusive Light’: Georg Lukács and Franz Kafka.”

Lukács, György. “The Importance and Influence of Ady,” The New Hungarian Quarterly, no. 35 (vol. 10, Autumn 1969), pp. 56-63.

Lukács, György. “Lukács on Futurology,” The New Hungarian Quarterly, no. 47 (vol. 13, Autumn 1972), pp. 101-147. Conversation with Lukács, Ferenc Jánossy, Mária Holló-Jánnosy, Jutta Matzner, September 1969.

MacDonald, Agnes Vashegyi. “The ‘Lukács Effect’ in Twentieth-Century Hungarian Literature and Film, Rocky Mountain Review, 63 (1): 3, 2009, pp. 26-42.

Madách, Imre. The Tragedy of Man; translated by William N. Loew, New York: Arcadia Press, 1908. (This translation only of historical interest. I recommend Mark and Szirtes.)

Madách, Imre. The Tragedy of Man; translated by J. C. W. Horne. Budapest: Corvina, 1963.

Madách, Imre. The Tragedy of Man; translated and adapted by Iain Macleod. Edinburgh: Canongate Press, 1993.

Madách, Imre. The Tragedy of Man; translated by Ottó Tomschey. Budapest, 2000.

Madách, Imre. The Tragedy of Man; translated from the Hungarian by George Szirtes; introduction by George F. Cushing; illustrations by Mihály Zichy. New York: Püski Publishing, 1988. Scene 13 on this site. Theater/Film w/ 2 links to the Tragedy. Introduction (pp. 5-18, sans footnotes).

Madách, Imre. The Tragedy of Man; translated from the Hungarian by Thomas R. Mark; illustrations by György Buday; with an afterword by Mihály Szegedy-Maszák. 2nd ed. Budapest: Black Eagle Press / Fekete Sas Kiadó, 1999. [1st ed.: 1989.] “The Tragedy of Man: A Reading” by Mihály Szegedy-Maszák, pp. 197-210.

Madách, Imre. The Tragedy of Man (CD-R), in 20 languages & 25 translations. Petőfi Museum of Literature and Centre for Contemporary Literature; Literature Databanks and Collections of Texts. (Includes Esperanto.)

[Madách, Imre.] Virtual Exhibition of Imre Madách’s Drama Reflected in Illustrations and Translations.

Mannheim, Karl. Ideology and Utopia: An Introduction to the Sociology of Knowledge, translated by Louis Wirth and Edward Shils, preface by Louis Wirth. London; Henley: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1960. (First English pub. 1936)

Mark, Thomas R. “Madach Revisited: Toward a New Translation of the Tragedy of Man,” Canadian-American Review of Hungarian Studies, vol. IV, no. 2, Fall 1977, pp. 145-154.

Mark, Thomas R. “‘The Tragedy of Man’: Salvation or Tragedy?,” Acta Litteraria Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, vol. 15, 1973, pp. 291-308.

Martin, Camille. Robert Zend - Part 5. Hungarian Literary Roots: The Budapest Joke and Other Influences. Rogue Embryo: a blog about poetry, collage, photography, whatnot. February 9, 2014.

Robert Zend Website

Robert Zend (Hungarian-Canadian writer, 1929-1985): Dedications, Works, Links

Robert Zend en Esperanto

MetaGalaktika #11: A Thousand Years of Hungarian Science Fiction, 2009, by Mariann Benkö and Gábor Takács, translated by Csilla Kleinheincz. Alternate URL @ The Portal.

Morse, Donald E. “When the Hungarian Literary Theorist György Lukács Met American Science-Fiction Writer, Wayne Mark Chapman,” in Anatomy of Science Fiction, edited & introduced by Donald E. Morse (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars, 2006), pp. 186-191.

Nagy, Moses M., ed. A Journey into History: Essays on Hungarian Literature. New York: Peter Lang, 1990. (American University Studies. Series XIX, General Literature, 0743-6645; Vol. 25)

Contents:
The genius of the Hungarian language and literature / Moses M. Nagy — Christian thought in Hungarian literature / Tibor Tuskés — Bálint Balassi / Moses M. Nagy — Romanticism in Hungary / Mihály Szegedy-Maszák — Imre Madách: “The tragedy of man” / Thomas R. Mark — Petőfi—the Irish connection / George Gömöri—An aesthete of anxiety and compassion: Dezső Kosztolányi, (1885-1936) / André Karátson — Two homelands: Mihály Babits and European consciousness in modern Hungarian literature / George Bisztray — Lázló Németh, the gentle misanthrope / Gyula Hellenbart — Hungarian literature outside of Hungary / Moses M. Nagy — The Shakespeare heritage in Hungary / Sándor Maller.

Nagy, Peter. “Lukács and Hungarian Literature,” New Hungarian Quarterly, 60, 1976, pp. 72-82.

Peter, Agnes. “The Reception of Blake in Hungary,” Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly, vol. 34, no. 3, Winter 2000/01, pp. 68-81.

Radó, György. “Hungarian Science Fiction 1860,” SF Tájékoztató, no. 6, 1972, pp. 41-44.

Sanders, Ivan. “Lukács and Hungarian Literature,” in Hungary and European Civilization edited by György Ránki & Attila Pók (Budapest; Akad. Kiadó; 1989), pp. 399-410.

Schäfer, Wolf. “Stranded at the Crossroads of Dehumanization: John Desmond Bernal and Max Horkheimer,” in On Max Horkheimer: New Perspectives, edited by Seyla Benhabib, Wolfgang Bonß, and John McCole (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1993), pp. 153-183.

Sheffield, Roy Scott. The Tragic Science of Leo Szilard. Dissertation. University of Florida, 1994.

A short history of Hungarian science fiction from the beginning to the 1980s.

Sohár, Anikó. The Cultural Transfer of Science Fiction and Fantasy in Hungary 1989-1995. Frankfurt Am Main: Peter Lang, 1997.

Gottlieb, Erika. Review of Sohar, Utopian Studies, Vol. 12, No. 1 (2001), pp. 260-262.

“Furthermore, probably Sohár should also refine her characterization of post-1989 fantasy literature by juxtaposing it with the fantasy literature written in Hungary before the Soviet regime, that is, in the first half of the 20th century, in the works of Frigyes Karinthy and Sándor Szathmári, for example. (Going even further back, one may even widen the perspective on the futuristic, speculative tradition in Hungary by taking note of elements of speculative fiction in that Hungarian classic, Imre Madách’s The Tragedy of Man, an 1860 verse drama containing intriguing speculation about the various avenues for the future of humanity.”

Sohár, Anikó. “Thy Speech Bewrayeth Thee: Thou Shalt Not Steal the Prestige of Foreign Literatures: Pseudotranslations in Hungary After 1989,” Hungarian Studies, vol. 14, no. 1 (2000), pp. 55-83.

Sőtér, István. The Dilemma of Literary Science, translated from the Hungarian by Éva Róna. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1973.

Contents:
The dilemma of literary science. — Of the comparatist method. — “Another” nature. — Lenin’s method. — Criticism and Romanticism in Gorky. — Period and currents. — Romanticism. Pre-history and periodization. — The emergence of Romanticism. — From the revolution of poetry to revolutionary poetry. — Hungarian romanticism. — Hungarian lyric poetry and the world. — World poetry — contemporary Hungarian poetry. — A small biographical dictionary. — Index of names.

Sőtér, István. “Imre Madách’s ‘The Tragedy of Man’,” New Hungarian Quarterly, 5, 1964, pp. 56-66.

Sőtér, István; Neupokoyeva, I[rina Grigor’evna]; eds. European Romanticism, translated by Éva Róna. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1977. See also:

M. Szenczi on Imagination & Nature according to Coleridge, Wordsworth, Blake, Bacon, & Kant

Stock, Adam. Mid Twentieth-Century Dystopian Fiction and Political Thought. Doctoral thesis, Durham University, 2001. (Durham E-Theses Online)

Szegedy-Maszák, Mihály. “Life-Conception and Structure in ‘The Tragedy of Man’,” Acta Litteraria Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, vol. 15, 1973, pp. 327-335.

Szegedy-Maszák, Mihály. “Romantic Drama in Hungary,” in Romantic Drama, edited by Gerald Gillespie (Amsterdam; Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1994), pp. 297-315. See also PDF file of this article.

Szerb, Antal. “History of World Literature (Excerpt, 1941: Aldous Huxley),” The Hungarian Quarterly, VOLUME XL * No. 153 * Spring 1999.

Tabori, Paul. “Introduction” (1964) in Voyage to Faremido. Capillaria; by Frigyes Karinthy, introduced and translated by Paul Tabori (Budapest: Corvina Press, 1965; New York: Living Books, 1966), pp. vii-xxi.

Tökei, Ferenc. “Lukács and Hungarian Culture,” in Georg Lukács: Theory, Culture, and Politics, edited by Judith Marcus & Zoltán Tarr (New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 1989), pp. 153-167.

The Tragedy of Man: Essays About the Ideas and the Directing of the Drama: Full Text of the Drama / Imre Madách, translated by Joseph Grosz, responsible editor: György Lengyel, selected and edited by Erzsébet Bereczky. Budapest: The Hungarian Centre of the International Theatre Institute (ITI), 1985.

Contents; Foreword by György Lengyel

A Dramatic Poem from Hungary to the Theatres of the World by Ferenc Kerényi, pp. 9-33

Vajda, Miklós. “Frigyes Karinthy, Humorist and Thinker,” New Hungarian Quarterly, vol. III, no. 6, April-June, 1962, pp. 42-67.

Vöő, Gabiella. “Critics and Defenders of H. G. Wells in Interwar Hungary,” in The Reception of H. G. Wells in Europe, edited by Patrick Parrinder & John S. Partington (London: Thoemmes Continuum, 2005), pp. 175-194.

Vos, Luk de. “Get Last, Man! Some Aspects of the Last Man Topos in European Literature” in Just the Other Day: Essays on the Suture of the Future, edited by Luk de Vos (Antwerp: EXA, 1985), pp. 441-464.

Worlds of Hungarian Writing: National Literature as Intercultural Exchange, edited by András Kiséry, Zsolt Komáromy, and Zsuzsanna Varga. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2016.

Zend, Robert. “Antihistory” (15 Oct. 1976), in Daymares: Selected Fictions on Dreams and Time, edited by Brian Wyatt, foreword by John Robert Colombo, afterword by Northrop Frye (Vancouver: Cacanadadada Press, 1991), pp. 88-90.

Zoltán, Hermann. “Poszttragédia,” Színház, 2011/07. Summary in English.


More on Georg (György) Lukács & His Contemporaries

Blanc, Levee. “Georg Lukács: The Antinomies of Melancholy,” Other Voices, vol.1, no.1, March 1997.

Congdon, Lee. Exile and Social Thought: Hungarian Intellectuals in Germany and Austria, 1919-1933. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991.

Congdon, Lee. “For Neoclassical Tragedy: György Lukács’s Drama Book,” Studies in East European Thought, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, June 2008, The Sociological Tradition of Hungarian Philosophy, pp. 45-54.

Congdon, Lee. The Young Lukács. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1983.

Cornis-Pope, Marcel; Neubauer, John; eds. History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe: Junctures and Disjunctures in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Amsterdam; Philadelphia: J. Benjamins, 2004. (Comparative History of Literatures in European languages; 19) Note Szathmári.

Déry, Tibor. “Reminiscences of Lukács,” The New Hungarian Quarterly, no. 47 (vol. 13, Autumn 1972), pp.150-153.

Forgács, Éva. “'You Feed Us So that We Can Fight Against You': Concepts of Art and State in the Hungarian Avant-Garde,” Arcadia: Internationale Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft,  vol. 1, no. 2, 2006, pp. 260-74.

Gluck, Mary. Georg Lukács and His Generation, 1900-1918. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1985.

Hungarian Studies on György Lukács, edited by László Illés et al., English translation editor, József Kovács. 2 vols. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1993. Volume 1. Volume 2.

Kadarkay, Árpád. “The Captive Mind of György Lukács,” Hungarian Review, vol. IV, no. 2, 22 March 2013.

Kadarkay, Árpád. “Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition - Part II,” Hungarian Review, vol. V, no. 2, March 2014.

Kadarkay, Arpad. Georg Lukács: Life, Thought, and Politics (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1991), Chapter 4 (The Nietzschean Moment), p. 85, 480; Chapter 8 (Leap of Faith), p. 198, 490. See extracts and quotes:

Karinthy mocks Lukács
Arpad Kadarkay on Lukács on Madách
Lukács in Moscow: RAPP, Mór Jókai, Socialist Realism

Kelemen, János. The Rationalism of Georg Lukács. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

Szilágyi-Gál, Mihály. Review of: Kelemen, János. 2013. The Rationalism of Georg Lukács; Hungarian Cultural Studies (e-Journal), vol. 7, 2014.

Kelemen János honlapja (web site).

Lendvai, Ferenc L. "György Lukács 1902-1918: His Way to Marx," Studies in East European Thought, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, The Sociological Tradition of Hungarian Philosophy, June 2008, pp. 55-73.

Löwy, Michael. Georg Lukács: From Romanticism to Bolshevism. London: New Left Books, 1981.

Nyíri, Kristóf. “On the Ideological History of the Hungarian Fin-de-Sičcle: Ady and Lukács,” translated by C. György Kálmán, in Hungarian Studies on György Lukács, Volume I, edited by László Illés et al., English translation editor, József Kovács (Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1993), pp. 9-18.

The New Hungarian Quarterly, no. 47 (vol. 13, Autumn 1972): In Memoriam György Lukács (1885-1971). (Special issue.)

Perecz, László. “The Background Scenery: ‘Official’ Hungarian Philosophy and the Lukács Circle at the Turn of the Century,” Studies in East European Thought, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, The Sociological Tradition of Hungarian Philosophy, June 2008, pp. 31-43.

Sanders, Ivan. "Symbolist and Decadent Elements in Early Twentieth-Century Hungarian Drama,” Canadian-American Review of Hungarian Studies, Vol. IV, No. 1 (Spring 1977), pp. 23-42.

Studies in East European Thought, vol. 60, no. 1/2, June 2008. Issue theme: The Sociological Tradition of Hungarian Philosophy. See also Congdon, Demeter, Forgács, Gángó, Lendvai, Perecz.

Szabó, Zoltán. “Twelve Notes about George Orwell (Excerpts),” translated by Zsuzsanna Walkó, Hungarian Review, vol. III, no. 6, December 2012.

Includes author’s personal account of Révai, Lukács, and censorship.

Szegedy-Maszák, Mihály. “Hungarian Writers in the 1956 Revolution,” Hungarian Studies, Vol. 20, no. 1, 2006, pp. 75-82. [1.83 MB - PDF]

Szegedy-Maszák, Mihály. “The Introduction of Communist Censorship in Hungary: 1945-49,” in History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe: Junctures and Disjunctures in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Volume III: The making and remaking of literary institutions (Amsterdam; Philadelphia: J. Benjamins, 2007), pp. 114-125.

Taft, Bernie. Testament of Georg Lukacs [interview], Australian Left Review, September 1971.

NB remarks on anti-Semitism.

Thompson, Michael J., ed. Georg Lukács Reconsidered: Critical Essays in Politics, Philosophy and Aesthetics. London: Continuum, 2011.

Vazsonyi, Nicholas. Lukács Reads Goethe: From Aestheticism to Stalinism. Columbia, SC: Camden House, 1997.

Warhurst, Christopher. Review (Michael Löwy, Redemption and Utopia: Jewish Libertarian Thought in Central Europe), Utopian Studies, vol. 6, no. 1 (1995), pp. 154-158.

György Lukács ~ il primo blog in progress dedicato a Lukács

Bibliografia


On Imre Madách & György Lukács in Hungarian — Links

Madách tragédiája (1955) / Lukács György

Madách Tragédiája mint negatív példa / Lukács György. (1) Elsõ megjelenés: A modern dráma fejlõdésének története (1911); (2) Balázs Béla és akiknek nem kell. Elõszó (1918); Madách tragédiája (1955).

Madách tragédiája - Madách-Lukács vitairat / Lukács György & Rónai Mihály András

Poszttragédia / Zoltán Hermann

A diktatúra teatralitása és a színház emlékezete: Rákosi Mátyás és a Nemzeti Színház 1955-ös Tragédia-előadása1 / Imre Zoltán

„A szabadság felelőssége” / Imre Zoltán

Katartikus-e a Tragédia? – Lukács György művészetfilozófiája felől nézve / Máté Zsuzsanna

Madách Imre, A Poeta Philosophus / Máté Zsuzsanna
(Tanulmányok Az ember tragédiája esztétikumáról)

„Eszmék közt azőr...”: Az ember tragédiája és a korabeli kritika antinómiái / Balogh Csaba
(Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, Bölcsészettudományi Kar, Doktori  Disszertáció)

Bibliográfia: Tanulmányok Madáchról

Madách Irodalmi Társaság


Texts on This Site

The Tragedy of Man by Imre Madách, translated by George Szirtes. Scene 13

The Tragedy of Man: Essays About the Ideas and the Directing of the Drama: Full Text of the Drama

Imre Madách by Dieter P. Lotze: contents & notes

On Hungarian Dramatic Literature by Georg Lukács, translated by Charles Senger

Die ungarische Dramenliteratur by Georg Lukács

The Metaphysics of Tragedy: Excerpts by Georg Lukács

The Importance and Influence of Ady” by György Lukács

Georg Lukács on Dostoevsky & the future of the novel

Arpad Kadarkay on Lukács on Madách

Karinthy mocks Lukács

Stavrogin’s Confession by Georg Lukács

Lukács in Moscow: RAPP, Mór Jókai, Socialist Realism

Interview with Lajos Kassák (Edit Erki)

Grave and Gay: Selections from His Work by Frigyes Karinthy

Ways of Thinking (artificial intelligence, cognitive science, Hungarian literature) by László Mérő

Nothing’s Lost: Twenty-Five Hungarian Short Stories: Contents

Robert Zend (Hungarian-Canadian writer, 1929-1985): Dedications, Works, Links

Curvaceous Enlightenment by Claudio Magris

Sebastiano Timpanaro on Giacomo Leopardi & Materialist Pessimism

Chapter VII: The Conflict of Languages from Anticipations by H. G. Wells

Leon Trotsky on H. G. Wells as Philistine

Adorno to Bloch on the Blockage of Utopia

Vonnegut in Hungary: postmodernism, hi-low genre hopping, & self-parody
("Studies in a Dying Culture" blog)


Mór Jókai — Links

Mór Jókai - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jókai, Mór (Encyclopedia of Science Fiction)

Chapter XIII: National Escapism: Jókai (in A History of Hungarian Literature From the Earliest Times to the mid-1970's) by Lóránt Czigány

JÓKAI Mór: The Novel of Next Century (1872 - 1874): Foreword

The Novel of Next Century
(Translated excerpts and chapter by chapter notes on Jókai Mór's early science fiction novel)

Jókai Mór: A jövo század regénye
(The Novel of Next Century in Hungarian)

Mór Jókai (1825-1904) | The Online Books Page

Jókai, Mór, 1825-1904: Project Gutenberg

Mór Jókai @ Ĝirafo


Frigyes Karinthy — Links

Voyage to Faremido - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Solfčge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

eszperente - Wiktionary

Exhibition on Frigyes Karinthy
Hungarian Literature Online, 04.25.2013

Frigyes KARINTHY ( 1887 - 1938 ) @ Publishing Hungary

Gulliver in Hungary: Frigyes Karinthy (1887-1938) by Lajos Jánossy, Hungarian Literature Online, 04.10.2008

I denounce humanity by Frigyes Karinthy, Books Around the Corner, March 17, 2015

The Nyugat Generation by Leo Kepler, Fiction Advocate, July 30, 2014

For more links & references, see Frigyes & Ferenc Karinthy in English on this site.


Esperanto — Tekstoj / Texts

Baghy, Julio. Sonĝe sub Pomarbo: Triakta Lirika Komedio en Ses Fantaziaj Bildoj. La Laguna: J. Régulo [Stafeto], 1958. (Bel-literatura eldonserio; 14)

Dumain, Ralph. “La tragedio de l’ homo en tri medioj,” Beletra Almanako n-ro 23, junio 2015, p. 95-102.

Dumain, Ralph. “La vivo, verkaro kaj muzikaj robotoj de Frigyes Karinthy,” Beletra Almanako, n-ro 27, oktobro 2016, p. 97-112. Vidu “Konkludo”n, p. 107: De Madách al Karinthy al Szathmári & Zend.

Dumain, Ralph. “Vojaĝo al hungara literaturo, tereno nekonata,” Kontakto, n-ro 271 (2016: 1), p. 12-15.

Fejes, Márton. “Efektiviĝo de evolutendencoj de la beletra lingvo — laŭ analiza komparo de tri tradukoj el ‘La Tragedio de l’ Homo’,” Hungara Vivo, 1987, n-ro 2, p. 54-57.

Gellért, Oszkár. “Adamo kun Madách,” tradukis Ferenc Szilágyi, en Hungara Antologio, redaktis Kálmán Kalocsay; kunlaboris Julio Baghy, Károly Bodó, László Halka, Ferenc Szilágyi, Ludwig Totsche (Budapest: Literatura Mondo, 1933), p. 168.

Kalocsay, Kálmán. “La Tragedio de L’Homo kaj Imre Madách” [prelego, 23 novembro 1964], en Dek Prelegoj, red. Vilmos Benczik (Budapest: Hungara Esperanto-Asocio, 1985), p. 107-110, kun notoj p. 124-125.

Karinthy, Frigyes. Norda Vento, el la hungara tradukis Karlo Bodó. Berlin: Rudolf Mosse, Esperanto-Fako, 1926.

Karinthy, Frigyes. Vojaĝo al Faremido, tradukis L. Tarkony. Budapest: Hungara Esperanto-Asocio, 1980. Kun Kapilario.

Karinthy, Frigyes. Vojaĝo al Faremido, tradukis L. Totsche. Inko, 2003. Revizio de eldono de 1933.

Madách, Imre. La tragedio de l’homo: drama poemo; kun dudek desegnaĵoj de Miĥaelo Zichy kaj kun la portreto de l'aŭtoro; el la hungara originalo tradukis K. Kalocsay. Budapest: Hungara Esperanto Instituto, 1924. viii, 237, [ix]-xxiv p. Kovrilo.

Madách, Imre. La Tragedio de l’ Homo: Drama Poemo, tradukis Kálmán Kalocsay. Budapest: Corvina, 1965.

Rátkai, Árpád. "La beletra rondo de la revuo Nyugat kaj la Internacia Lingvo", en Beletra Almanako, n-ro 8, junio 2010, p. 63-95.

Rátkai, Árpád. “Frigyes Karinthy la esperantisto,” en Abunda fonto: Memorlibro omaĝe al Prof. István Szerdahelyi (Poznań, Poland: ProDruk & Steleto, 2009), p. 340-347.

Madách, Imre. La Tragedio de l’ Homo: Drama Poemo, tradukis Kálmán Kalocsay. Budapest: Corvina, 1965.

Setälä, Vilho. “La Tragedio de l’ Homo — la Eterna Lukto,” Norda Prismo, 1968, n-ro 1, p. 9-13.

SHI Chengtai. ‘Al horizonto de la historio de la homaro — pri “La Tragedio de L’ Homo”,’ Riveroj, 22, novembro 1998, p. 18-23.

Sőtér, István. “Imre Madách kaj La Tragedio de l’ Homo” en La Tragedio de l’ Homo: Drama Poemo de Imre Madách, tradukis Kálmán Kalocsay (Budapest: Corvina, 1965), p. 5-14, 253.

Szathmári, Sándor. “La Tragedio de L’Homo (kritiko),” Sennacieca Revuo, n-ro 100, 1972, p. 35-40.


Esperanto — Retligoj Ĉi-reteje / Links on This Site

Imre Madách kaj La Tragedio de l’ Homo” de István Sőtér

La Tragedio de L’Homo (Kritiko) de Sándor Szathmári

La Tragedio de L’Homo kaj Imre Madách” de Kálmán Kalocsay

La Tragedio de l' Homo de Imre Madách tradukita de K. Kalocsay (Librokonigo)

Al horizonto de la historio de la homaro — pri “La Tragedio de L’ Homo” de SHI Chengtai

Kompara analizo de tri tradukoj el La Tragedio de l’ Homo de Márton Fejes

Adamo kun Madách de Oszkár Gellért

La tragedio de l’ homo—la eterna lukto” de Vilho Setälä

Mór Jókai” de Zsuzsa Varga-Haszonits

Mondlingvo de Mór Jókai” de Tivia

Volapuka Lando en Siberio” (Pri "Csalavér" de Mór Jókai)

“Flava Rozo” & Kálmán Kalocsay de Éva BENICKÁ

Frigyes (Frederiko) Karinthy (1887-1938) en Esperanto

La Dia Providenco” de Frigyes Karinthy, tradukis K. Kussinszky

Renkontiĝo kun junulo” de Frigyes Karinthy, tradukis Vilmos Benczik

Norda Vento de Frigyes Karinthy, el la hungara tradukis Karlo Bodó

»Norda Vento« de Karinthy de K. R. C. Sturmer

Frigyes Karinthy la esperantisto” de Árpád Rátkai

Esperanto kaj Literaturo” de Kálmán Kalocsay

I. Mátyás interparolis kun K. Kalocsay

Kiel mi amikiĝis kun Imre, Sándor, Mihály, k. a.” de William Auld

La Rolo de la Persona Faktoro en la Esperanta Literaturo (La Verkisto) de Éva Tófalvi

Kontraŭrevoluciaj fortoj dum la hungara proletara diktaturo de György Lukács

Arta partikulareco kaj Esperanto de Roberto Passos Nogueira [pri teorio de Georg Lukàcs]

Árpád Tóth (1886‑1928)

El Unuminutaj noveloj

Uz-instrukcio al la “Unuminutaj noveloj”

La senco de la vivo

In memoriam dr. K.H.G

La Mesio

Regularo pri ekzekuto (tradukis Márton Fejes)

Lernu fremdajn lingvojn! (tradukis Márton Fejes)

Kiam finiĝas la milito? (tradukis D-ro István Nagy)

La mortinto de Iván Mándy (trad. Ildikó Király), with links to related Esperanto & English pages

RNA” de Gyula Hernádi, trad. Vilmos Benczik

Hungara Antologio (1933)

Hungara Antologio, redaktis Vilmos Benczik (1983)


Esperanto — Retligoj Alireteje / Offsite Links

Lukács vs. science fiction? (Ĝirafo)

Sándor Szathmári @ Ĝirafo

Frigyes Karinthy @ Ĝirafo

FRIGYES KARINTHY (1887-1938) de Vilmos Benczik

Frigyes KARINTHY (Literaturo en Esperanto, Tradukita, en la reto, en Esperanto / Don HARLOW)

Hungarian Esperantists (Snipview)

Famous Hungarian Poets - Famous Poets from Hungary
(Includes Baghy & Kalocsay)


Podcasts

Description at Studies in a Dying Culture radio show (sponsored by Think Twice Radio):

05/07/16 Frigyes Karinthy: the Hungarian Swift & his musical robots (sound file, 57 min.) by R. Dumain
                (@ 47 min.: discussion of Sándor Szathmári, Robert Zend, György Lukács; quote at end from Mihály Babits)


Bibliographies & Web Guides on This Site / Bibliografioj & Regvidiloj Ĉi-reteje

Johannes Linnankoski (Pseudonym of Johannes Vihtori Peltonen, 1869-1913): Literature in English & Esperanto

From Eden to Cain: Unorthodox Interpretations & Literary Transformations: Selected Bibliography

De Edeno al Kaino: Malkutimaj Interpretoj & Literaturaj Pritraktoj en Esperanto: Bibliografio

Frigyes & Ferenc Karinthy in English

Frigyes (Frederiko) Karinthy (1887-1938) en Esperanto

Sándor Szathmári (1897–1974): Bibliografio & Retgvidilo / Bibliography & Web Guide

Géza OTTLIK (1912 - 1990) Study Guide & Bibliography

Robert Zend (Hungarian-Canadian writer, 1929-1985): Dedications, Works, Links

Robert Zend en Esperanto

Karel Čapek: Selected Bibliography & Web Links

Sciencfikcio & Utopia Literaturo en Esperanto / Science Fiction & Utopian Literature in Esperanto: Gvidilo / A Guide

Science Fiction & Utopia Research Resources: A Selective Work in Progress

Hungarian Science Fiction Films

Pessimism as Philosophy: A Jaundiced Selected Annotated Bibliography

Georg Lukács’ The Destruction of Reason: Selected Bibliography

Theodor W. Adorno & Critical Theory Study Guide


Online Sources on Hungarian Literature & Culture

Encyclopedia of Science Fiction: Hungary

Hungary SF summary 2012 (08/10/2012)

Contemporary Hungarian SF novels - SFmag.hu by Cristian Tamas (24/09/2013)

Utopia and Dystopia - Possible Futures

Hungarian Literature Online

Digital Library of Hungarian Studies

MEK (Magyar Elektronikus Könyvtár) / Hungarian Electronic Library

Virtual Exhibition of Imre Madách’s Drama Reflected in Illustrations and Translations

A History of Hungarian Literature From the Earliest Times to the mid-1970's by Lóránt Czigány

Imre Madách

Chapter XIII: National Escapism: Jókai

Chapter XIX: The Grotesque: Frigyes Karinthy

A Brief History of Hungarian Literature by Piero Scaruffi

The Nyugat Generation by Leo Kepler, Fiction Advocate, July 30, 2014

Babelmatrix: Babel Web Anthology — the Multilingual Literature Portal

Publishing Hungary

Hungarian Cultural Studies e-journal

Hungarian Review (Volume I, No. 1, November 2010 - ) Some cultural content

The Hungarian Quarterly, no. 138-204 (Summer 1995 - Winter 2011)

Canadian-American Review of Hungarian Studies, 1974-1980

Hungarian Studies, 1985-2007

International Association for Hungarian Studies

Hungarian Studies (journal)

Studies

CEEOL: Central and Eastern European Online Library
(registration / login required for open access & purchasable items; total site content is searchable)

Hungarian literature

Browse by journals (select Hungary)

The Hungarian Quarterly (2005-2001)

Hungarian Review (same as Hungarian Review above)

Margaret Papp Perry Memorial Hungarian Books Collection

Elektronikus Periodika Archívum és Adatbázis - EPA - Electronic Periodical Archives and Database

REAL-J - Repository of the Library and Information Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

George Szirtes Website

George Szirtes, poet and translator

Lee Congdon Website - Publications

György Lukács ~ il primo blog in progress dedicato a Lukács

Bibliografia

Lukács Archívum


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Uploaded 10 June 2012
Reorganized 12 November 2015
Last update 4 February 2017
Previous update 11 January 2017

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