Archive for the continental philosophy category

Martin Kusch, Psychologism (3)

Kusch, Martin. Psychologism: A Case Study in the Sociology of Philosophical Knowledge. London; New York: Routledge, 1995. See also the Four Appendices to Psychologism (1995). http://www.academia.edu/1078102/Four_Appendices_to_PSYCHOLOGISM_1995_ Finally we come to Kusch’s summary and conclusions. Kusch summarizes the book and his approach to Sociology of Philosophical Knowledge (SPK). Kusch adheres to Bloor’s strong programme in the […]

Martin Kusch, Psychologism (2)

Kusch, Martin. Psychologism: A Case Study in the Sociology of Philosophical Knowledge. London; New York: Routledge, 1995. See also the Four Appendices to Psychologism (1995). http://www.academia.edu/1078102/Four_Appendices_to_PSYCHOLOGISM_1995_ Husserl was preoccupied with psychology and himself was tarred with the label of psychologism. Descriptive phenomenology “serves to prepare the ground for psychology as an empirical science.” Husserl was […]

Martin Kusch, Psychologism (1)

Kusch, Martin. Psychologism: A Case Study in the Sociology of Philosophical Knowledge. London; New York: Routledge, 1995. See also the online appendices: Four Appendices to PSYCHOLOGISM (1995) http://www.academia.edu/1078102/Four_Appendices_to_PSYCHOLOGISM_1995_ This book is fascinating. Abstruse as it is, for me it’s like reading a detective novel. I put this among the top half dozen books illuminating aspects […]

Bruce Kuklick’s history of American philosophy (8)

Kuklick, Bruce. A History of Philosophy in America 1720-2000. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001. 346 pp. $19.95 (pbk), ISBN 0199260168. Part III: Professional Philosophy, 1912-2000 …………………… 14. The Tribulations of Professional Philosophy, 1962-1999 Continuing, rather returning to the beginning of Chapter 14: Philosophy benefited from the huge expansion of higher education following World War II. Geographical mobility […]

Bruce Kuklick’s history of American philosophy (6)

Kuklick, Bruce. A History of Philosophy in America 1720-2000. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001. 346 pp. $19.95 (pbk), ISBN 0199260168. Part III: Professional Philosophy, 1912-2000 . . . . . . 12. Europe’s Impact on the United States . . . . . . So now we are up to chapter 12: Europe’s Impact on the […]

Witold Gombrowicz: Philosophy in 6 1/4 hours (1)

Witold Gombrowicz, A Guide to Philosophy in Six Hours and Fifteen Minutes; translated by Benjamin Ivry. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004. 109, [1] pp. Lessons/Sections: [1] First Lesson: Kant 1724-1804 [+ Descartes] (27 April 1969) [2] Second Lesson: Kant: The Categories (28 April 1969) [3] Third Lesson: Kant (30 April 1969) [4] Fourth Lesson: […]

McCarthyism, American Philosophy, & Black philosophers

About a decade ago I received this list at a conference of the American Philosophical Association and uploaded it: The Honor Roll: American Philosophers Professionally Injured During the McCarthy Era by John McCumber Following this conference I investigated various writings of McCumber and summed up my reactions in a section of my web page New […]

Existential America (5): C.L.R. James, Richard Wright, & Kierkegaard

I knew Richard Wright very well indeed. I may have mentioned this to some of you. Dick fancied himself as a cook. He would cook rice and chicken or something in some Southern way and say, “Come over, I’m going to cook today.” I used to eat it. But he was a remarkable man. One […]

Globalization of obscurantist philosophy

I have written several relevant entries both on this blog and on my Reason & Society blog. The most generic keywords to search on are ‘globalization’, ‘ethnophilosophy’, ‘postmodernism’, and ‘liberalism’ or ‘neoliberalism’ where such keywords are used. But any post on non-western philosophy is likely to be relevant, the most numerous being ‘Asian philosophy’ or […]

Bergson, apostle of reactionary irrationalism

A draft from March 5, 2009. I don’t recall what I planned to write, but here are the references: Nizan, Paul. “The End of a Philosophic Parry: Bergsonism,” Les Revues, 1929, reprinted in Paul Nizan, Intellectuel Communiste Maspero (Paris, 1967). Nizan exposes Bergson’s empty pseudoconcreteness, which reminds me of Adorno’s later evisceration of Heidegger. My […]