Archive for the liberalism category

Bruce Kuklick’s history of American philosophy (4)

Kuklick, Bruce. A History of Philosophy in America 1720-2000. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001. 346 pp. $19.95 (pbk), ISBN 0199260168. Part II: The Age of Pragmatism, 1859-1934 ………. 10. Instrumentalism in Chicago and New York John Dewey moved to the University of Chicago in 1894. He was influenced by the Social Gospel, but Protestantism was not […]

Chinese Dialectics (2)

Tian, Chenshan. Chinese Dialectics: From Yijing to Marxism. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2005. x, 237 pp. CONTENTS: INTRODUCTION 1 1 Tongbian: A Chinese Strand of Thought 22 2 Marxism in China: Initial Encounters 49 3 Tongbian in Preliminary Reading of “Dialectics” 72 4 Qu Qiubai’s Reading of Dialectical Materialism 89 5 Popularizing Dialectical Materialism 108 […]

Existential America revisited

Cotkin, George. Existential America. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003. Contents: Acknowledgements Chapter One Introduction 1741-1949: American Existentialists before the Fact Chapter Two The “Drizzly November” of the American Soul 1928-1955: Kierkegaardian Moments Chapter Three Kierkegaard Comes to America Chapter Four A Kierkegaardian Age of Anxiety 1944-1960: The Era of French Existentialism Chapter Five The […]

Globalization of obscurantist philosophy

I have written several relevant entries both on this blog and on my Reason & Society blog. The most generic keywords to search on are ‘globalization’, ‘ethnophilosophy’, ‘postmodernism’, and ‘liberalism’ or ‘neoliberalism’ where such keywords are used. But any post on non-western philosophy is likely to be relevant, the most numerous being ‘Asian philosophy’ or […]

Ethnoepistemology

Originally titled “Ethnoepistemology, my ass!”, written 2 August 2008. Excuse all the cuss words. I’ve cut out a few of the epithets, but I’m preserving the flavor of my diatribe. * * * * * Ethnoepistemology (James Maffie), The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. There are often lapses and biases in reference works in the humanities […]