Archive for the Herbert Marcuse category

Bruce Kuklick’s history of American philosophy (8)

Kuklick, Bruce. A History of Philosophy in America 1720-2000. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001. 346 pp. $19.95 (pbk), ISBN 0199260168. Part III: Professional Philosophy, 1912-2000 …………………… 14. The Tribulations of Professional Philosophy, 1962-1999 Continuing, rather returning to the beginning of Chapter 14: Philosophy benefited from the huge expansion of higher education following World War II. Geographical mobility […]

Bruce Kuklick’s history of American philosophy (6)

Kuklick, Bruce. A History of Philosophy in America 1720-2000. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001. 346 pp. $19.95 (pbk), ISBN 0199260168. Part III: Professional Philosophy, 1912-2000 . . . . . . 12. Europe’s Impact on the United States . . . . . . So now we are up to chapter 12: Europe’s Impact on the […]

Marcuse, one-dimensionality, & the fate of utopia

Note these two articles on Marcuse’s development: Discovered manuscript shows Marcuse’s evolution by Laura Gardner, Brandeis Now, Oct. 9, 2013 Newly Discovered Draft of Marcuse Book Reveals Turn Toward Pessimism by Marc Parry, The Chronicle of Higher Education, September 30, 2013 Note also the upcoming conference at Brandeis University, 1-2 October 2014: The Many Dimensions […]

Route 66, where the surrealist rubber meets the road

This cartoon by Sam Cobean appeared in The New Yorker, Sept. 1947, p. 57. The caption reads “I knew we should have kept on Route 66 out of Flagstaff.” I first found this cartoon in a publication of the Chicago surrealists: Letters to Chicago Surrealists (October 1971-March 1973), prefaced by “Herbert Marcuse and the Surrealist Revolution” […]

Marcuse vs operationalism, empiricism, & linguistic philosophy

I’ve just re-read chapter 7 of Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man, which pinpoints his objections to the prevailing Anglo-American philosophy of the day, i.e. the philosophy of language dominant in analytical philosophy, and the treatment of concepts generally in philosophy and the social sciences. He has a particular objection to the empiricist reduction of thought to operationalism […]

Wittgenstein’s philosophy as politics

Robert Vienneau’s blog Thoughts on Economics has an entry Wittgenstein and Marxism on my Wittgenstein, Marxism, Sociology: An Annotated Bibliography. More importantly, Vienneau provides his own bibliography Wittgenstein and Soviet Communism, mostly in connection with Piero Sraffa and referencing articles from New Left Review. There is also this noteworthy article: Robinson, Christopher C. (2006). “Why […]