Archive for the Heidegger category

Existential America (7): Highway 61 revisited

When I first read George Cotkin’s Existential America several years ago, I came across this review: T. H. Adamowski, “Out on Highway 61: Existentialism in America,” University of Toronto Quarterly, Volume 74, Number 4, Fall 2005, pp. 913-933. From this link you can download a PDF of the full text. The reviewer is obviously highly […]

Martin Kusch, Psychologism (2)

Kusch, Martin. Psychologism: A Case Study in the Sociology of Philosophical Knowledge. London; New York: Routledge, 1995. See also the Four Appendices to Psychologism (1995). http://www.academia.edu/1078102/Four_Appendices_to_PSYCHOLOGISM_1995_ Husserl was preoccupied with psychology and himself was tarred with the label of psychologism. Descriptive phenomenology “serves to prepare the ground for psychology as an empirical science.” Husserl was […]

James Bond and Philosophy (1)

James Bond and Philosophy: Questions Are Forever, edited by James B. South and Jacob M. Held. Chicago; La Salle: Open Court Publishing Company, 2006. Popular Culture and Philosophy; Volume 23. The Popular Culture and Philosophy series is quite uneven, in my estimation. Popular culture has eclipsed traditional print culture as the fount of cultural authority, […]

Witold Gombrowicz: Philosophy in 6 1/4 hours (2)

Witold Gombrowicz, A Guide to Philosophy in Six Hours and Fifteen Minutes; translated by Benjamin Ivry. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004. 109, [1] pp. [8] Existentialism [Heidegger, Husserl, Sartre] (4 May 1969) [9] Existentialism [Kierkegaard, Descartes, Sartre] (5 May 1969) [10] Freedom in Sartre (6 May 1969) [11] The View of Others [Sartre] (7 […]

Witold Gombrowicz: Philosophy in 6 1/4 hours (1)

Witold Gombrowicz, A Guide to Philosophy in Six Hours and Fifteen Minutes; translated by Benjamin Ivry. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004. 109, [1] pp. Lessons/Sections: [1] First Lesson: Kant 1724-1804 [+ Descartes] (27 April 1969) [2] Second Lesson: Kant: The Categories (28 April 1969) [3] Third Lesson: Kant (30 April 1969) [4] Fourth Lesson: […]

Existential America (4): Kierkegaard analyzed (1942)

Otto F. Kraushaar, “Kierkegaard in English. I”, The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 39, No. 21 (Oct. 8, 1942), pp. 561-583. While long recognized in Scandinavian, German, and theological circles, Kierkegaard began to be profusely translated into English only in the three years preceding the writing of this article, in which eight books are under review. […]

Review: Brian O’Connor, Adorno’s Negative Dialectic (1)

Adorno’s Negative Dialectic: Philosophy and the Possibility of Critical Rationality Brian O’Connor Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2004. http://www.scribd.com/doc/87513357/Brian-O-Connor-Adorno-s-Negative-Dialectic-Philosophy-and-the-Possibility-of-Critical-Rationality-The-MIT-Press 1 I did a very quick read of this book, which is a preposterous thing to do considering the difficulty of the subject matter. Furthermore, it is not fully comprehensible without a thorough grounding in Kant, […]

Adorno on Teutonic “depth”

“The appearance of depth is frequently the product of a complicity with suffering. A monstrous German tradition associates profound thoughts with the theodicy of evil and death. A theological terminus ad quem is tacitly assumed, as if what determined the dignity of an idea were its result, the confirmation of transcendence, or its immersion in […]

Habermas & Sartre on silence

“In this situation, silence would be a false response: the person who is addressed and remains silent, clothes himself in an aura of indeterminate significances and imposes silence. For this, Heidegger is one example . . . . Because of this authoritarian character Sartre rightly called silence ‘reactionary’.” SOURCE: Habermas, Jurgen. “Transcendence from Within, Transcendence […]

The Institution of Philosophy (4)

Cohen, Avner; Dascal, Marcelo; eds. The Institution of Philosophy: A Discipline in Crisis? La Salle, IL: Open Court, 1989. Joseph Margolis, “Radical Philosophy and Radical History,” pp. 249-270. Wittgenstein, Heidegger, and Derrida may have wanted to put an end to traditional philosophy, but at most they provided self-corrective measures, not the therapies they though they […]