Archive for the Albert Camus category

Existential America (7): Highway 61 revisited

When I first read George Cotkin’s Existential America several years ago, I came across this review: T. H. Adamowski, “Out on Highway 61: Existentialism in America,” University of Toronto Quarterly, Volume 74, Number 4, Fall 2005, pp. 913-933. From this link you can download a PDF of the full text. The reviewer is obviously highly […]

Bruce Kuklick’s history of American philosophy (8)

Kuklick, Bruce. A History of Philosophy in America 1720-2000. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001. 346 pp. $19.95 (pbk), ISBN 0199260168. Part III: Professional Philosophy, 1912-2000 …………………… 14. The Tribulations of Professional Philosophy, 1962-1999 Continuing, rather returning to the beginning of Chapter 14: Philosophy benefited from the huge expansion of higher education following World War II. Geographical mobility […]

Existential America (6): Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, C.L.R. James

Cotkin was wise to include Black American appropriations of existentialism, as this gives me an opportunity to test my hypothesis that their perspective was different from white people’s investment in existentialism, and particularly that Wright used Kierkegaard for different purposes than his white contemporaries. Chapter 8 features Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison. Sartre unwittingly and […]

Existential America (2): Richard Wright on Albert Camus

The Stranger. Translated from the French by Stuart Gilbert. New York: A. A. Knopf, 1946. “It [The Stranger] is a neat job but devoid of passion. He makes his point with dispatch and his prose is solid and good. In America a book like this would not attract much attention, for it would be said […]